Monthly Archives: September 2014

Enjoying a new paper

Maine Washday                                  Maine Washday                       10.5 x 14.5                                                      watercolor

Adventure with a new paper:

The paper is not really new.  In fact Twin Rocker has been around for quite a while. It is an American hand made paper and you can order on line. A few months back I was posting about various challenges some of my students were having with paper.  If you paint you know some of the stories.  Some painters will shy away from hand made paper because they either fear the price or they are troubled about quality.  As a lover of paper I am always looking for great paper.  I purchased a few sheets of Twin Rocker along with a French hand made that I will feature later. This paper is Twin Rocker 22″ x 30″ cold press A.  I love the feel and I love the action.  It has a hard surface and takes a good washing and is marvelous for drybrush. The color hold out is superb and the dried washes sparkle.  The paper is tough. It can take scrubbing out as well as scratching out with a sharp knife. It will also take masking without disturbing the surface of the paper.   I have several more sheets and even though I have quite a bit of paper Twin Rocker will remain high on my favorites list. Keep in mind that I pay full price for my paper just like you so I have no monetary incentive to hype some one’s product.

 

About the painting….A Long History:

This is a very recent watercolor but it has a long history. I’ll explain. In an earlier post I wrote about the fact that the sketches in my sketchbooks are not in chronological order. It has always been my habit to pick up the book that is near at hand.  I’ll shuffle through and find a blank page and begin to sketch.  Consequently, you can flip a page or two and note that some sketches are many years apart. Perhaps this will drive many people to distraction but for me the book is a tool. When I am in need of something to draw on I get the one that is readily available. At times I will go through the studio and attempt to organize things and sketchbooks and put them in some sort of order.   After all, at some point a book does fill up. At that point it is no longer in my easy to reach stack. Perhaps I am a bit too frugal in that I really don’t like to waste pages and I try to make use of every page in a book.

Discovery:

You could say that I discovered this sketch in one of my books. Mind you, it had been there all along yet for some reason I had overlooked it.  Better yet, in my philosophy, I found it when I was ready to see it.  I actually experienced this spot on a summer trip to Maine many years ago. I sketched it and fully intended to paint right there but for some reason it didn’t happen. In reality I have a life time of sketches and ideas from Maine to Nova Scotia. In fact my first two books were compiled while in that region and many of the pieces at that time were influenced by my trips into that beautiful land.

The Connection:

Due to current technology many of my readers will have no frame of reference for clothes hanging on a line in the summer sun.  My connection is my childhood. Every Monday was wash day in the Rankin household. The only thing that prevented or delayed that ritual was terribly inclement weather. If it happened to rain or snow for a few days clothes would dry in the house. However that was unusual. I can remember my mother taking a dampened rag and walking along cleaning the clothes lines before putting the fresh wash in the lines. I can still see her wicker wash basket and canvas bag that held her clothes pins.   In my mind’s eye I can still hear those sheets and some articles of clothing flapping and flowing with the breeze .  It wasn’t hard for a small boy to imagine that the sheets were huge sails on a pirate ship popping as the wind stirred them. When the clothes were dry and brought into the house the crisp fresh aroma of the outdoors permeated the room.  At that time in my life air conditioning did not exist but the moving breeze through the open windows added to the wonderfully fresh aroma.  This sketch brought back all of those wonderful memories full of sounds and smells.

They say you can’t go back:

A writer once wrote that you can’t go back. Well, maybe he is not quite right. In reality I think I know what he meant and on some levels I agree. However, my sketchbook is my time machine. I use my sketches to propel me back to the moment so that I CAN smell the smells and hear the sounds. Granted, no doubt, much of the unimportant is forgotten or perhaps my mind remembers it the way it wants to.  Regardless, there is a remembrance and I like my mind’s  colors and memory better than most photographs. As I age I find even more treasure in solitude and the limited quiet of my backyard that settles near a lively creek.  Perhaps there is a connection, I have always loved wilderness and now I am not as able to explore the wilderness so I draw upon memory.

Want to know more about Mastering Glazing Techniques in Watercolor?

Mastering Glazing Techniques in Watercolor, Volume 1 by Dr. Don Rankin is available direct at

http://www.createspace.com/3657628 

Enjoy a remastered classic watercolor tutorial. NOW IN DVD format .

The Antique Shop  available direct at : http://www.createspace/350893 

You can enroll in a 2.5 hour watercolor course on watercolor glazing techniques by Dr. Don Rankin.  The course covers paper basics as well as paints, along with color discussion with theory and basic painting techniques. Enroll now for lifetime access. You can enjoy at your convenience and go at your own speed.

https://www.udemy.com/mastering-glazing-techniques-in-watercolor 

 

Coming soon a full tutorial on Goose-Xing…a recent painting.

Take the time to “See” your subject

Take the time to “See” your subject.

Take the time to “See” your subject

goosexing11DSC_0055_259                                                      “Goose Xing”                     Watercolor                                              30″ x 22″

I make no excuse for the fact that at times I slow down and work very slowly. I think all of us need to find our own rhythm. Some subjects develop quickly; others need to be savored like a fine wine. At least that is my philosophy. I have been working or perhaps I should say thinking on a subject for a few years now. It is a common ordinary neighborhood street. A tree lined street that is traveled regularly by a lot of friends and neighbors. The two lane street weaves its way past a golf course on one side and a pleasant lake on the left. In the spring and summer months the lake has more visitors than in the winter.  Regardless, it is a local gathering place for young and old, walkers, joggers and moms and dads with strollers. Usually they are carrying lots of stale bread for the feathered inhabitants.

Nearly 35 years ago we began to receive new neighbors….Canada geese.  If you don’t live on the edge of the lake perhaps you find them more enchanting.  If they are overrunning your yard and your deck you may not feel so charitable. None the less they are now permanent residents.  Since their presence is firmly established they even have their own traffic signs.   It seems that the local human population has learned to adapt.  It is not uncommon to see joggers take to the street to avoid a collision when the local goose population calls for a congregational meeting on the side walk.  At times the group will choose to slowly move across one of the streets to a feeding spot in a nearby yard or return from their foray heading back to the lake.  Whenever they cross, motorists  slow down or come to a complete stop to allow the feathered residents to parade across the road. To human credit I see little sign of injury to any of the feathered pedestrians.

Earlier, I mentioned tree lined streets. At the edge of the golf course there are groups of ornamental fruit trees marking the boundaries of the course. Over the years I have painted several of these trees and incorporated some of their characteristics into sketches as well as paintings. I am greatly intrigued with their shape, color and texture. They have a presence that begs to be painted.  I have indulged my passion for several years in that regard.  I have tons of sketches and planned paintings that have not yet  matured to the point of becoming paint.

Preparation:

In this case the sign haunted me for several months. I had never seen such a sign warning of a Goose Crossing.  I am very familiar with Deer signs and have seen my share of Elk and Moose signs in my travels.  However, a Goose Crossing was a new element.  I though about it.  I stared at it. I would drive by slowly and just look at it. Finally, I began to sketch it and some of the local feathered actors.

Sketching: 

It is impossible for me to separate the process of thinking and sketching. However, for clarity I have broken these two elements into preparation and sketching. Preparation= contemplation.  Sketching= bringing that contemplation into form. My personal taste is drawn to more direct observation and sketching with less photography.  Don’t misunderstand, I own a great Nikon and I use it.  However,  I am more in tune with my own perceptions. In too many cases I find the photos don’t “see” or record the subject the same way my eyes and my memory does. As I have gotten older I have become less dependent upon the photo. Naturally there are times when the camera is absolutely essential. I’m merely trying to convey that I’m more concerned with my personal vision.

I fill up a lot of sketchbooks and I must confess that I often pick up one or the other when I need one. This has resulted in a group of sketches that are in no chronological order. In some cases there may be sketches on facing pages that are years apart in execution. No doubt that will disturb the neat and orderly ones. However, it is what it is.  Lately I have had a couple of art dealers who have admonished me to become more orderly. I am making progress I now have a fairly accurate inventory listing of paintings along with where they reside. At this time my sketchbooks  are still a bit of a chronological disaster!

Sketching tools:

Most of the time I use a refillable TomBow pen with black ink. Several years ago a dear colleague gave me one as a present. Since that time I have gone through about three or four.  I tend to lose them and later find them in a jacket or pants pocket. I also use markers of varying widths.  I find pencils to be messy and somewhat wimpy when I am in the field. I do own quite a few and use them regularly in the studio. Outdoors I like an  instrument that is devoid of an eraser. It helps keep me focused.

goosexingsketcheDSC_0060_260                                          Some of the sketches for Goose Xing

Color:

Color is personal.  As I began this piece I wanted to keep it low key but I wanted color. I chose to work with complementary combinations. Red and green were the primary agents  I paired colors like Perylene Maroon with Permanent Sap Green and Hookers Green.  Holbein’s leaf green with American Journey Copper Kettle.  Other colors included Transparent Oxide Yellow, Gamboge, Andrews Turquoise and Joe’s Blue another American Journey color.

Why?

As stated earlier, color is personal. I paint in summer as well as winter. I love the cloak of muted colors as the plant world slumbers awaiting spring.  When I look at the fungus on an old growth tree I see a riot of color, I also see silvery greys and tawny muted ochres.  I try to create these colors with color combinations rather than using dull faded color. Experiment with the quinacridones.  They are extremely transparent and can be manipulated in mixed combinations placed directly on the paper or they can be used in glazes to create vibrant jewel tones as  well as lively yet subdued winter color.

FUTURE RELEASE: 

The painting Goose Xing has been recorded for instructional purposes. It is under going final editing.  It will probably be several hours of demonstration.  At this time the final cut is uncertain. It was painted in real time and will be available in a few weeks.

Want to know more about Mastering Glazing Techniques in Watercolor tutorials Check out,

https://www.udemy.com/mastering-glazing-techniques-in-watercolor

Mastering Glazing Techniques in Watercolor,  Volume 1 by Dr. Don Rankin is available direct at

Http://www.Createspace.com/3657628

The Antique Shop DVD, a remastered classic of the watercolor glazing technique featuring Don Rankin   

Http://www.Createspace.com/350893

.

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