Monthly Archives: April 2017

Revisiting Old Paintings

Milking Time final cropMilking Time                                           27″ x 14.75″                    watercolor

This painting is a part of a larger story.  The actual piece  had its beginnings a little over 30 years ago.  I just recently finished the work but I think there is a valuable object lesson to be shared.  From time to time in my career I have been involved in painting portraits. One of my most unusual as well as gratifying opportunities came when a land owner commissioned me to do a portrait.  Not an usual request.  However, there was one exception.  This “family” member was a prize bull. I accepted the challenge and the painting was well received and was hung in a prominent location in the house.

During my time in the pasture I had an opportunity to see the light change and create many wonderful shapes as it played across the ground and the cattle. Milking time was inspired by that portrait session. Even though these cows had nothing to do with the bull and were kept in a separate pasture I was attracted to the light and the shapes they made as they patiently awaited milking.  A few weeks later I began to piece together my sketches and ideas and began the painting in my studio.  After a few days I just seemed to lose energy and questioned my original idea.  I set the watercolor, still secured to one of my plywood boards, aside.

Losing the energy:

As I wrote in the beginning that was a little over thirty years ago.  Perhaps the rest of the story will support my wife’s contention that I suffer from packratism!  Thirty years is a long time to ignore a piece of work that just somehow wasn’t clicking.  At least in my mind I just couldn’t get up the enthusiasm to finish the painting. A few days ago I discovered the old watercolor after I had completed another work. It was patiently waiting, still secure and no worse for the wait. I looked at the old piece and decided that it did have some potential after all. I began to apply new washes with a great deal of intent. After a few days of glazing and dry brushing I consider it finished.

milkingtime30yrMilking Time in it’s beginning stages. 

This photo was taken before I added any more work to the piece. It is a good opportunity for everyone to see what happens as more washes and refining strokes are applied.

The Moral of the Story?

While I don’t really recommend waiting thirty years to solve visual challenges in a painting; it is often good to put a painting away for a bit of time. I recommend this if you are having a problem trying to figure out what is going wrong in the work. Putting a piece out of sight for 2-3 days can do wonders for your process. If you are terribly impatient placing your painting so you can see its reflection in a mirror will help you see  areas that are not working.   If you are a painter don’t be too hasty to trash a work just because you are having trouble solving your visual puzzle.

Want to know more about glazing techniques in watercolor?

Mastering Glazing Techniques in Watercolor by Dr. Don Rankin  is available direct from the artist  at  http://www.createspace.com/3657628 

Online watercolor instruction about the watercolor glazing techniques with Don Rankin available:  LEVEL I: Building a foundation in watercolor glazing techniques with short and simple watercolor exercises.  Learn at your own pace. https://www.Udemy.com/mastering-glazing-techniques-in-watercolor/

LEVEL II: mDesigned for students who want to see the application from start to finish on  a more complex level: https://www.Udemy.com/mastering-glazing-techniques-in-waterolor-level-II/

 

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